The Roundy research group studies the properties of condensed matter systems including liquid water, superconductors and nanotubes using first-principles computational methods. Currently, we are focusing on the creation of a classical density functional to describe water, and application of this approach to aqueous interfaces and systems in aqueous solution. For more information, see the slides from my colloquium in fall 2012. Undergraduates might also like to see the slides from my presentation at the freshman seminar.

My second research emphasis has been in the development of computational physics laboratory courses and understanding student learning of thermodynamics. For more information, see my education page.

In addition to our Physics research, we have also occasionally taken a jaunt into the world of Computer Science. In particular, we are have used the pure functional language Haskell to solve interesting problems, in particular involving the darcs revision control system. For more information, see the slides from a colloquiem given in the Computer Science department in fall 2006. In addition, our current research code, Deft uses Haskell to automatically generate C++ code to evaluate gradients.